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EIA releases ethanol stats for first nine months of 2012

By Erin Voegele | December 28, 2012

In late December the U.S. Energy Information Administration released its latest monthly energy statistics. The most recent Fuel Ethanol Overview includes data gathered for the first nine months of 2012.

According to the report, the U.S. ethanol industry produced 1.029 billion gallons of ethanol in September, a slight decrease when compared to the 1.1 billion gallon production level recorded for August. The relative production levels for Sept. 2010 and 2011 were 1.101 billion gallons and 1.117 billion gallons.

During the first nine months of 2012, the EIA reported that the U.S. ethanol industry produced 10.086 billion gallons, an increase over the 9.784 billion gallons produced during the same time period in 2010, but a decrease when compared to the 10.312 billion gallons produced during the first nine months of 2011.

The U.S. imported more ethanol than it exported in September, with a net import level 694,000 barrels. According to the EIA, the net import level for the U.S. during the first nine months of the year was -7.529 million barrels.

Regarding consumption, the U.S. marketplace consumed 1.03 billion gallons of ethanol in September.  Consumption levels for the first nine months of the year were up slightly compared to the same periods of 2010 and 2011. During the first nine months of 2012, the U.S. consumed 9.695 billion gallons of ethanol. The relative consumption levels for 2010 and 2011 were 9.511 billion gallons and 9.615 billion gallons.

Earlier in the month, the EIA released its Short-Term Energy Outlook for December, noting that ethanol production was expected to rebound to pre-drought levels by the second half of 2013.

 

 

 

1 Responses

  1. Aniiesha

    2013-01-07

    1

    $100/month "buried" anybody, but it has focred changes in behavior, altering standards of living. You need look no further than any auto dealer's truck lot to see that. Where this change may be harder to stomach is if we're talking about our grandmothers on fixed-income. But we're not far down that road yet; maybe granny only makes it to bingo three times a week for a few months. But if fuel jumps to $5/gal quickly (I expect it will by December), that may be a different story.Alright, enough of that. On to my comment.According to Figure 2 , large-truck fuel economy has moved from around 5.75 miles per gallon in 1980 to 7.25 in 2005. Not quite 71%...Both anonymous and fred have a point, the average fuel economy of cars on the road today may be lower than stated; I can't actually get to the source document linked from the posting, but I'm assuming the numbers used are average of vehicles available, maybe even average fuel economy of all vehicles sold. Either way, I doubt that's counting large trucks.Anonymous' statement about the point being lost on those sitting at home is not that there are people in the margin, it's that rapidly elevated fuel prices are putting more people in that margin. This may also be as a result of the recession/inflation combination, but gas prices aren't helping anybody out in that arena.

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